The Flag of the United States of America

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America
and to the Republic
For which it stands
one Nation under God,

indivisible,
with liberty and justice for all.

The Flag of the United States of America is a symbol of us all — of all America. It is not a political symbol. It is a symbol that each American should respect, for it represents the honor, courage and sacrifice of those who struggled to preserve the ideals upon which our country was founded: Freedom, justice and opportunity for all. Contrary to other flags of the world, the U.S. Flag is the flag of its citizens – the people of all ages that make and keep America a stronghold and an example of freedom.

“Throughout the history of our nation, the flag has evoked intense, sincere feelings of patriotism.” 

Jimmy Carter, 39th President of the United States

Some of the history and etiquette for our National Symbol follows. Our politicians in Washington need to review these guidelines!

Even more than the eagle, our flag, the flag of these United States of America, is a living symbol. Many of us look upon it as the embodiment of the spirit of this great land. Sometimes referred to as “Old Glory’, it has been cherished for years as the embodiment of what we stand for as a nation.

It is a standard of Honor that we should respect. Our reverence for our flag is justified by past and present sacrifices for freedom and liberty. To me, it is a symbol of the incredible bravery and sacrifices of the children, and the men and women of this country. Yes, “children”, because children have fought for this country, from the Revolutionary War to WWII and beyond. From children barely able to carry a musket; to men like my father, who enlisted in WWII at the age of 17.

Throughout the world, our flag signifies a people dedicated to liberty, justice and freedom. There is a magic in our flag. It brings hope to war-torn countries when carried in by our troops. Whenever I see the flag, my hope of a better nation is renewed; that this nation, under God, will continue to be an example everywhere for all people who love freedom with honor. In honoring and saluting our flag we demonstrate affection for our nation, our fellow citizens and the proud future we share.

The Pledge of Allegiance to our flag was written in August of 1882 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Columbus’s voyage. The celebration plans resulted in Columbus Day being designated a holiday for the whole country by President Benjamin Harrison. The original 23 words read as follows:

I pledge allegiance to my Flag
and to the republic
For which it stands
one Nation, indivisible,
with liberty and justice for all.

In 1923 the original verse was changed from “I pledge allegiance to my Flag” to “I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America.”  

When the Pledge of Allegiance is recited, citizens should stand at attention and salute by placing their right hand over the heart with the first word and hold the salute through the last line of the Pledge. The salute is directed to the flag by facing it during the Pledge.

The United States Flag Code was first adopted in 1924 prescribes flag etiquette for a variety of circumstances ensuring that our national symbol is treated properly. The Code is explained in great detail on the National Flag Foundation’s website for anyone wishing to explore it in greater detail. The Code is a guide for civilians and civilian groups who wish to properly honor the United States of America’s principle emblem. Each military branch has its own flag code of military etiquette.

 In 1943 the Supreme Court of the United States decided that “No one – child or adult – could be forced to say ‘The Pledge of Allegiance’. To force someone to say it was in opposition to ‘freedom and justice for all.’  It was in 1954 that Congress added “under God” to the Pledge. It was pointed out that Abraham Lincoln had called the United States “this nation under God” in ‘The Gettysburg Address.’

When the flag is presented, all persons should come to attention. All persons in uniform should give the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may also render the military salute. All other persons should salute by placing their right hand over their hearts. Men wearing any non-religious headgear are to remove it. Women do not have to remove their head covering. In parades and reviews, it is proper to start the salute as the flag enters your position and end when it has passed.

The Flag of the United States of America should be raised briskly and lowered slowly and ceremoniously, and is saluted as it is hoisted and lowered. Each individual should stand at attention facing the flag and salute. It is also proper to salute whenever the national anthem is played. The salute is held until the flag is unsnapped from the halyard or through the last note of the National Anthem whichever is the longest. It is not considered appropriate for US citizens to salute another countries flag or anthem.

Ordinarily it should be displayed only between sunrise and sunset. It should be illuminated if displayed at night. There are eight sites in the United States where the flag is flown day and night under specific legal authority: Fort McHenry National Monument, Baltimore, Maryland; Flag House Square, Baltimore, Maryland; the United States Marine Corps Iwo Jima Memorial, Arlington, Virginia; Lexington, Massachusetts; the White House; the Washington Monument; United States Customs ports of entry; and Valley Forge State Park, Pennsylvania.

 

The United States Flag should always be treated with the utmost care and respect. Remember, our flag represents a living country and, as such, is considered a living thing. For instance, the lapel flag pin, being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart. The flag should always be displayed with the blue union field up. The only time you ever display the flag upside down would be as a signal of extreme distress.  

We should always carry the flag aloft and free — never flat or horizontally. The exception to this is carrying very large flags that are too big to be flown from a staff or pole. It is important to always keep the flag clean.  Keep it safe from those who would not respect it, or do not know enough to do so, such as young children.

I am very grateful to be born in the United States. We are so blessed to live in this great nation. There is so much unrest and focus on things that are irrelevant, and the most important thing that we as Christians can do is to pray for our country. Thank God that you live in what is still the greatest country in the world, despite what politicians and others are doing to tear her down.

“And rend your heart and not your garments.” Now return to the Lord your God, For He is gracious and compassionate, Slow to anger, abounding in lovingkindness And relenting of evil.”
Joel 2:13 NASB1995

https://bible.com/bible/100/jol.2.13.NASB1995

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